1.   Arabian Days In Paris

American Way - Sojourns


Less than a block from Notre Dame stands a cultural bridge that links the mysteries of the Islamic civilization to the West - Paris' Institut du Monde Arabe. Designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, the 27,000-square meter institute is shaped like a prism, illuminating the cityscape and innovatively wedding Moorish antecedents...  ➜ read full article

Travel

  1.   Argentine Asado

American Way - Sojourns


Argentine asado is no meal for a vegetarian. Hunkering down for this South American barbecue is serious carnivorous business. Rooted in tradition, asado shares a historical link with the Argentine gaucho, who roamed the pampas, tended livestock, and ravenously celebrated the end of the day with this dish.➜ read full article

  1.   Chic Eats

American Way - Sojourns


People literally go out of their way to enjoy alfresco dining in San Francisco. Inventive restaurateurs have turned nondescript alleys between the city's financial towers and Chinatown into havens for chic eateries with outdoor seating. Savory scents tempt unsuspecting pedestrians to detour down the back streets... ➜ read full article

  1.   Come To Your Senses

American Way - Sojourns


On the southeast side of Golden Gate Park, cloistered from San Francisco's mercurial climate, grows a living museum devoted to the senses. The Strybrig Arboretum's Garden of Fragrance, a treasure chest of olfactory surprises, sets the most indifferent nose quivering.

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  1.   Cruising San Diego, Venetian Style

American Way - Sojourns


Mamma mia, it's a pleasing sight: sleek black gondolas traversing the waters under a starlit sky to the strains of Verdi and Puccini. Venice, Italy? No, it's San Diego, California, where the city's new Gondola di Venezia is making quite a splash.

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  1.   Dishing It Out

American Way - Sojourns


Santa Fe's culinary scene encompasses a variety of cuisines, from new Southwestern to heart-healthy to continental French. But that's not the whole enchilada. Situated downtown in a seventeenth-century building, you'll find The Shed, the home of classic New Mexican cooking for more than forty years. ➜ read full article

  1.   In Defense Of French Bread

American Way - Sojourns


Ever since King Dagobert I recognized bread-making as a bona fide trade back in the seventh century, the savory scent of French bread has wafted through history. After all, the French Revolution might never have occurred had Marie Antoinette not uttered her fatal faux pas: Il's ont plus de pain, qu'ils mangent de la brioche... ➜ read full article

  1.   Mountain Refuge

American Way - Sojourns


When Native American tribes first made their summer homes on Volcan Mountain's remote peaks centuries ago, they called it a "place where the water comes from." Land speculators christened it Sunrise Valley, and cartographers dubbed it Earthquake Valley. But regardless of what it's called, Volcan Mountain is a stunning... ➜ read full article

  1.   Paris: Barefoot In The Parks

American Way - Sojourns


Magnifique, another foolish French institution bites the dust - grass, or not walking on it, that is. For the past few hundred centuries, an ancient Napoleonic law has prohibited Parisians from prancing on the city's perfectly manicured lawns. Those who had the temerity to ignore the red- and-blue warning signs incurred a.... ➜ read full article

  1.   Parisian Library Has A French Twist

American Way - Sojourns


Ooh la la, the French have done it again. They've taken a rundown wine-broker's warehouse in Paris and turned it into the European literary monument of the twenty-first century - the Bibliotheque nationale de France, a $2 billion public library on the Left Bank. 

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“We wander for distraction, but we travel for fulfillment”, Hilaire Belloc.